Hot Springs2021-05-07T05:55:36+00:00
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FUN FACTS

Established in 1890, Evans Plunge Mineral Springs was the Black Hills’ first commercial attraction.

Nearly 500 rescued mustangs run free at the Black Hills Wild Horse Sanctuary.

Hot Springs’ 18-hole golf course boasts 380 feet of elevation change.

Welcome to Hot Springs!

More stories on Hot Springs

A Winter Walk on River Street

With its unique sandstone architecture, fun shops, tasty eateries and, of course, the flowing waters that gave it its name, Hot Springs is a delightful stop for travelers. Bernie Hunhoff recently took a stroll down River Street in the Fall River County town with camera in hand. Here’s what he found.

Major or Not?

To my thinking, at age 11, Hot Springs seemed like South Dakota’s most impressive city. And yes, by that point in my life I’d visited acknowledged major U.S. cities, namely Denver, Des Moines and Minneapolis. The notion that Hot Springs perhaps didn’t fit that category never crossed my mind. To my knowledge those other places had no vast, glowing hotel made of sandstone like the Evans. For sure they didn’t claim the world’s largest indoor naturally heated swimming pool.

Hot Water and Old Bones

We can say it began 26,000 years ago, when an enormous sinkhole formed on what would eventually become the southern edge of Hot Springs. The prehistoric creatures that roamed the continent — mammoths, giant short-faced bears, camels — ventured to the oasis to drink, only to discover its banks were too slippery to ascend. They died and were buried there, lost for millennia.

The Mammoth Man

Volunteers have come and gone in the Mammoth Site’s 40 years of operation, but Larry Agenbroad was always there. He became the site’s principal investigator shortly after the first tusk was unearthed in 1974 until his death on Friday, Oct. 31 in Hot Springs. Though the bones had been there for millions of years, Dr. Agenbroad helped open a new and unique window to prehistoric history that South Dakotans and countless visitors from around the world have enjoyed.

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